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SONY ACQUIRES MUBADALA'S SHARE IN EMI PUBLISHING
So, yeah, that's big. (5/23a)
I.B. BAD: PERFECT STORMS
Spotify, Vivendi, Childish, more. (5/23a)
DOWN THE TUBE: LYOR'S PRESS TOUR
He's the Wile E. Coyote of the music biz. (5/23a)
YOUR TOP 20: MIDWEEK SHOWDOWN (UPDATE)
Looks we have a horse race. (5/23a)
IRVING ISN'T BUYING
LYOR'S HYPE
One succinct, well-aimed tweet (5/23a)
THE NEW LEADERS
We chat with the top label execs about changing times.
NEW & DEVELOPING ARTISTS SPECIAL
They're young, they're happening and we've got 'em.
PIZZA PLACEMENT
Songs by the slice.
A.I. AND OUR FUTURE
Planning for Skynet.
Critics' Choice
REVISITING BRUCE ON BROADWAY
5/4/18

By Phil Gallo

In revisiting Springsteen on Broadway at the Walter Kerr Theater nearly seven months after first seeing it, Bruce Springsteen has turned it into a better show these days.

He is looser than in the performances that earned him raves back in October, moving more onstage and integrating extra dynamics into the show through simple actions—stepping away from the mic or pushing the volume of a guitar.

At that October show I felt a subtle distinction between the portions of his autobiography he reads and the material written for the show; that separation is gone. He has a better sense of how to play for laughs and how to pause after lines get a round of approving applause—he’s not just playing himself, he’s learned how to use the skills of an actor to more dramatically tell a story.

At that first show, “Brilliant Disguise,” “Tougher Than the Rest,” “Thunder Road” and “Born to Run” were favorites; this time it was the medley of “Dancing in the Dark” and “Land of Hopes and Dreams,” “My Hometown” and “Long Walk Home.” In a Broadway season when complaints abound regarding the paltry selection of musical offerings, Springsteen continues to deliver a show that will be talked about for decades. And, one hopes, may inspire others to consider the Broadway stage when the opportunity arises.

 

EL GOODO REDUX
4/26/18

It was 25 years and one day ago that the reborn Big Star—original members Alex Chilton and Jody Stephens, plus Posies Jon Auer and Ken Stringfellow—played a historic show in the parking lot of the Missouri Tigers’ basketball arena in Columbia, which became the title of the ensuing live album on Zoo. Our own Karen Glauber and Bud Scoppa, who have some history with the legendary cult band, wouldn’t have missed this special occasion for the world. Immediately below, engineer/producer Jim Rondinelli remembers that magical day and the events leading up to it.

“25 years ago, on one of the proudest if most intensely stressful days of my life, I had the honor of recording Alex Chilton, Jody Stephens, Ken Stringfellow and Jon Auer for the Big Star Columbia album.

“We had a few days of rehearsals in Seattle, but logistics precluded a full sound check on the day of the show. The final album is presented as the show was played---one shot, no overdubs. Oh yeah—I should mention that this show of a lifetime was happening outdoors in a leaky tent.

“This shot was taken behind the old MetroMobile remote truck just after we completed recording. [Zoo’s] Bud Scoppa fearlessly supported my scheme to capture the show as a record from day one, and deftly shepherded the album to release. I remember Karen Glauber, James Barber, Scott Byron and I all being in a state of disbelief that it actually happened. Some feared Alex wouldn’t show. I never did. And despite his reputation, let it be known that Alex was a dream to work with from rehearsals through the completion.

“Somehow, it did happen. And somehow, the rain held off until evening. I feel lucky to this day just to have been there to see it all happen.

“I do miss those days.”

AN ERIC ANDERSON CELEBRATION
4/10/18

The lack of space on the stage at New York’s City Vineyard gave Eric Andersen little reason for pause Monday night. He just lined up his guest musicians in the audience at the record release concert at for his Sony Legacy/Real Gone compilation The Essential Eric Andersen, which covers music he recorded for Columbia, Arista, Warner Bros., Smithsonian Folkways and others between 1964 and 2010. Joining Anderson, who spent more than two hours covering his history from 1965’s “Dusty Box Car Wall” up to a new song he recently recorded, were, from left, guitarist Lenny Kaye, saxophonist Robert Aaron, Jayhawks member and Legacy exec John Jackson and guitarist Steve Addabbo. The well-traveled folk musician, who told tales about Rick Danko, Lord Byron and Lou Reed between affecting performances of “Blue River,” “Violets of Dawn” and “You Can’t Relive the Past,” is heading out on a 17-city tour that stops at McCabe’s in Santa Monica on 5/5.