Quantcast
 Email

 First Name

 Last Name

 Company

 Country
CAPTCHA code
Captcha: (type the characters above)

THE MOST-STREAMED SONGS OF THE YEAR
You know it's not the same as it was. (12/2a)
HITS LIST: LABELED
WITH LOVE
Long live Hitsville USA. (12/2a)
2022 (NEARLY) FINAL MARKETSHARE
IGA and Republic are on top. (11/30a)
THE BIGGEST ALBUMS OF 2022
A Bunny, a Taylor and a Morgan walk into a bar... (11/30a)
SONG REVENUE:
XMAS IS COMING
It's the most wonderful time of the year. (12/2a)
GRAMMY SEASON
Artists sound off on the prospect of being nominated
CATALOG ECONOMICS
They're changing the game... for some.
VOTING AGAINST FASCISM
You're helping with the runoff, right?
IS IT CHRISTMAS YET?
Blighty Beat
POLS BACK ARTISTS IN STREAMING
10/25/21

A group of 44 British politicians has backed a bid for increased revenue from streaming for artists in the form of equitable remuneration—one idea that was tabled during the economics of streaming debate earlier this year.

In a letter written to Prime Minister Boris Johnson and reported by The Telegraph, the group of Conservative MPs argue for a change in law that would serve artists with a greater proportion of streaming income.

MP Esther McVey, who organized the letter, said that for musicians to recover from the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, “big international corporations who have benefited from the Government’s help during the crisis should start paying musicians properly for the music they use.”

As has been put forward by the DCMS committee, which delivered the damning economics of streaming report in July, the group is calling for a two-word amendment to the 1988 Copyright, Designs and Patents Act that would see artists and record labels split streaming revenue 50/50, as is the case for U.K. radio. 

Musicians’ Union General Secretary Horace Trubridge welcomed the support. “For too long, streaming platforms, record labels and other internet giants have exploited performers and creators. We must put the value of music back where it belongs—in the hands of the music makers.”

The support arrives hot on the heels of news that the U.K.'s Competition and Markets Authority is launching a study on music streaming, which will see it scrutinize whether competition within the sector is "working well."